WEOS Finger Lakes Public Radio

Beth Adams

Beth Adams joined WXXI as host of Morning Edition in 2012 after a more than two decade radio career. She was the longtime host of the WHAM Morning News in Rochester, where she was recognized for her work by the New York State Associated Press Broadcasters Association and the New York State Humane Society. Her career also took her from radio stations in Elmira, New York to Miami, Florida.

Beth is active in the Rochester community, having volunteered for organizations including the Humane Society at Lollypop Farm, the Heart of Gold Children's Foundation, the Rochester Press Radio Club Children’s Charities, and the Rochester Broadway Theater League Education Committee.  She is an avid reader of historical fiction and a devoted animal lover. Beth is married to award-winning writer and author Scott Pitoniak. 

Volunteer fire departments and ambulance corps across New York have a tough time recruiting volunteers.  A group of state lawmakers say an incentive may make that easier. 

Republicans in the Senate and Assembly are proposing full state income tax exemptions for volunteer firefighters and EMS personnel.

Assemblyman Stephen Hawley said the tax break would also be a way to demonstrate gratitude for the work these people do.

Adoptee rights advocates are urging New York lawmakers to pass legislation allowing adopted people to get unrestricted access to their birth certificates when they turn 18.

"Why should we be treated any differently than anyone else?" asked Annette O'Connell, spokesperson for the New York Adoptee Rights Coalition.

Adoptees say it's a matter of equal rights, but opponents of the measure worry about birth parents' rights to privacy.

The global demand for milk and other dairy products is expected to increase more than 50 percent in the next 30 years, but climate change is threatening the dairy industry.

Dairy cows produce less milk and are susceptible to infertility and disease when the weather is warm.

March is Women's History Month, and local historians and National Park Service rangers led members of the media on a guided tour of the Women's Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls on Wednesday.

They were calling attention to the backlog of repairs needed at that site and all of New York's national parks.

Fred Capozzi, a member of the Seneca Falls Historical Society, said they're urging Congress to pass the Restore our Parks Act to free up some much-needed funding.

A new, state-of-the-art lab will be built in Geneva where researchers will study the genetics of grapes.

Senator Chuck Schumer says $68.9 million in funding will support the project through a federal agriculture appropriations package.  The facility will be located at the Cornell AgriTech campus in Geneva where researchers are currently working out of leased space.

Senator Chuck Schumer was in the Finger Lakes region Monday, urging members of the House to reauthorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

Schumer says it provides critical funding that protects water resources and historical sites in every county across the U.S.

The New York Democrat and Senate Minority Leader spoke at the Women’s Rights National Historical Park in Seneca Falls.

Organizers of Saturday’s third annual Women March in Seneca Falls say they're not experiencing the same lack of unity that's been reported among leaders of the Women's March on Washington, D.C.

Charges of anti-Semitism have cast a shadow over the national event.  But in Seneca Falls, march organizer Leah Ntuala says their commitment to inclusion and diversity have never wavered.

The Rochester Finger Lakes region was the epicenter of the suffragist movement in the 19th century.  Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucretia Mott are the names that quickly roll off the tongue of any historian or third grade student.

But another woman who made significant contributions to the cause is a name you may have never heard: Jean Brooks Greenleaf. 

This morning, members of the Greece Historical Society did their part to change that.

When it comes to how people of color are portrayed in local media stories, there is a disconnect between what community members and the media perceive.

That's one of the findings of a series of polls commissioned by Causewave Community Partners for its Shaping our Stories report. The surveys questioned 550 residents statistically reflective of local demographics and 46 members of Rochester area media outlets. WXXI News participated in the survey.

You may have to go to the Adirondacks to see the most vibrant colors this fall.

If the relatively warm and wet weather continues for the next several weeks, the fall foliage season will be delayed and less vibrant than normal in Rochester and the Finger Lakes and other parts of upstate New York.

That's the word from Taryn Bauerle, an associate professor of plant science at Cornell University.

The same thing happened last year, but Bauerle says this isn't harmful to trees.

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