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Marchers brave bitter cold to celebrate women's suffrage and encourage people to vote

About 2,000 people braved bitterly cold temperatures and snow for a rally and march in Seneca Falls on Saturday. The event was part of three days of activities designed to “inspire all Americans to take an active role in democracy," encourage eligible voters to get out the vote and honor the legacy of women in leadership. Thousands gathered in cities across the country Saturday as part of the nationwide Women's March rallies that focused on issues such as climate change, pay equity,...

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About 2,000 people braved bitterly cold temperatures and snow for a rally and march in Seneca Falls on Saturday.

The event was part of three days of activities designed to “inspire all Americans to take an active role in democracy," encourage eligible voters to get out the vote and honor the legacy of women in leadership.

Thousands gathered in cities across the country Saturday as part of the nationwide Women's March rallies that focused on issues such as climate change, pay equity, reproductive rights and immigration. 

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center have received a $6.7 million federal grant to study how to reduce the toll of the opioid epidemic in rural Appalachian counties.

Faith leaders in Monroe County issued letters to Gov. Andrew Cuomo and state legislators this week urging them to continue upholding bail reform. 

Rev. James Simmons is one of seven clergy who signed the letter addressed to Cuomo, Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins, and Attorney General Letitia James calling on them to support bail reform despite backlash from some legislators and police who claim the new law will leave dangerous criminals on the streets.

11 shows to see in January

Jan 15, 2020

The New Year is finally here, and there’s no better way to get 2020 off to a strong start than with some live music. Here’s a look at some big shows coming to Central New York in the coming month.

A report by the state Comptroller finds that New York ranks number one in being shortchanged in tax money from the federal government.

A report by Comptroller Tom DiNapoli finds New Yorkers gave $26.6 billion more dollars in tax money in 2018 to the federal government than they got back, ranking it 50th among the 50 states.

“We are part of a very small number of states that are net donors to the federal government,” said Di Napoli who said New York’s congressional delegation should push the issue during budget negotiations.

Rochester Drug Cooperative, which has paid millions of dollars to settle federal charges connected to opioid trafficking, said Tuesday that it will no longer sell any controlled substances.

On Monday, Senator Chuck Schumer condemned the federal government’s lack of action to assist veterans with some health conditions linked to Agent Orange exposure. The senator says this affects around 20,000 Vietnam-era veterans in the Rochester-Finger Lakes region.  He made the comments at the Veterans Outreach Center in Rochester.

Legislators and local law enforcement joined an anti-human trafficking coalition in Rochester on Friday for a roundtable discussion about proposals to decriminalize prostitution in New York state. 

Melanie Blow with Rochester Regional Coalition Against Human Trafficking said she believes that full decriminalization of prostitution would increase instances of human trafficking.

“This is a very, very complicated issue, this is a very nuanced issue, so to educate elected officials, to educate the public, we wanted to have an in-depth conversation about this,” Blow said.

A new theater opens in Canandaigua this weekend and its backers hope it fills a vital need in the local arts community.

It’s called the Sands Constellation Theatre, and it’s part of the Fort Hill Performing Arts Center on Fort Hill Avenue.

The theater dates back to the 1920s, and it is the former Canandaigua Academy School auditorium.

Democrats who lead the state Senate approved several measures on Thursday to make it easier to vote. But a newly energized Republican minority wanted to talk about other topics, such as worries about undocumented immigrants voting and whether to repeal recently enacted bail reform measures.

On the second day of the legislative session, the Senate lost no time in acting on a number of bills to allow more voter participation. 

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