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SUNY, CUNY to require COVID-19 vaccinations

WXXIs Karen DeWitt reports that Gov. Andrew Cuomo says if students want to enroll this fall at State or City University of New York colleges, they’ll need a COVID-19 vaccination. Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday that all State and City University of New York students will have to get a COVID-19 vaccination if they want to enroll in the fall semester. The governor also announced other incentives to get more New Yorkers vaccinated as the rate of those getting their shots continues to decline....

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A union representing correction officers in New York filed a federal lawsuit Monday to overturn the Humane Alternatives to Solitary Confinement Act, or HALT, a new law passed in March to limit the use of solitary confinement in state prisons.

The New York State Correctional Officers and Police Benevolent Association, or NYSCOPBA, claimed in the suit that the new law violates the federal civil rights of its members.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday that all State and City University of New York students will have to get a COVID-19 vaccination if they want to enroll in the fall semester.

The governor also announced other incentives to get more New Yorkers vaccinated as the rate of those getting their shots continues to decline.

Cuomo said the SUNY and CUNY boards will vote to enact the requirement at their next meetings.

Laura Tobia held up a photo of her two brothers, John and Billy, during a Zoom press conference Friday.

“I want to put a face with their names because they're real people,”  Tobia said.

Both of her brothers live in a group home, and are fully vaccinated.  Billy, however,  has a severe case of cerebral palsy and cognitive impairment, along with a very complex seizure disorder. 

Tobia said, due to the state’s delay on updating group home COVID-19 guidelines, Billy still isn't able to attend his day-hab program.

  

The New York State Senate held a hearing this week on a measure that would seal conviction records for up to 2 million New Yorkers who have committed serious crimes and served time in prison for them.

Senators heard from people who were formerly imprisoned or on probation who said the barriers to housing and employment they encounter because of their convictions have led to a form of “perpetual punishment."

Gov. Andrew Cuomo late Wednesday signed the New York Health and Essential Rights, or HERO Act, calling it “a historic step forward for working people.”

The law sets enforceable health and safety standards to protect workers from COVID-19 and future airborne infectious diseases in the workplace. Supporters held a celebratory news conference on Zoom on Thursday.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Wednesday that Broadway shows will reopen on Sept. 14, and that there will be new rules for attending baseball games, including incentives for the unvaccinated.

Cuomo said tickets will go on sale May 6 for Broadway shows.

The governor also announced new rules for Yankees and Mets baseball games.

Vaccinated ticket holders can sit in adjacent seats with a group of fully vaccinated family and friends.

New York tourism experts say the great American road trip is back, and they're counting on people's pent-up desire for travel and cravings for regional food specialties to lure them upstate this year.

"That's what our data tells us," said Ross Levi, vice president and executive director of tourism at I Love New York, who added that people want to travel to close destinations reachable by car.

Tourism organizations from Buffalo to Binghamton are collaborating on a new campaign called "Upstate Eats Trail."

The New York State Legislature approved measures that will require hospitals and nursing homes to meet minimum staffing levels of nurses and other health care staff.

Measures mandating minimum staffing at health care facilities have been around for several years, but the spotlight on stressed and understaffed hospitals and nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic finally prompted the bill’s passage.

Senate sponsor and Health Committee chair Gustavo Rivera spoke before the vote.

Tenants in New York who continue to experience financial hardship as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic would be safe from eviction until the end of August under a bill approved Monday by both chambers of the state Legislature.

The bill would extend the current moratorium on residential and commercial evictions in New York until Aug. 31. 

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday that some remaining COVID-19 restrictions in New York will end in a couple of weeks, including capacity limits on most events, and in some cases, the 6-foot social distancing rule.


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