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Cuomo, in remarks, redefines sexual harassment

WXXIs Karen DeWitt reports that Gov. Andrew Cuomos remarks about sexual harassment prompted the attorney of one of his accusers to remark that the governors ignorance of the law is truly alarming. Gov. Andrew Cuomo fueled new controversy Thursday over sexual harassment allegations against him when he sought to redefine the definition of sexual harassment in state law during a question-and-answer session with reporters in the Bronx. Cuomo is accused of kissing and hugging women without their...

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Gov. Andrew Cuomo fueled new controversy Thursday over sexual harassment allegations against him when he sought to redefine the definition of sexual harassment in state law during a question-and-answer session with reporters in the Bronx.

Cuomo is accused of kissing and hugging women without their permission, and in one instance, groping under a female aide’s shirt. He has admitted that he also said things to female staffers, including questions about their dating habits, that might have made them uncomfortable.

It’s been over two months since New York Attorney General Tish James began investigating multiple allegations of sexual harassment against Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

The governor, who at first expressed confidence in James’ ability to be objective, has increasingly questioned her motives.

Cornell University’s prison educational programs have been on hold during the pandemic, but a theater professor has found a way to keep connected with incarcerated people. 

For decades, performing arts professor Bruce Levitt has used theater as a way to engage with people who are incarcerated. 

A new federal program will provide low-income residents with a monthly subsidy to help pay for internet service.

The Emergency Broadband Benefit Program will provide a monthly subsidy of up to $50 to eligible residents to pay for internet services, and up to $75 for households on Native American territories.

Saying she and other adult sexual abuse survivors deserve their day in court, Marissa Hoechstetter is looking to the New York State Legislature to make that possible.

Hoechstetter said former Columbia University doctor Robert Hadden sexually abused her in 2010, when he conducted routine medical exams during her pregnancy.

A union representing correction officers in New York filed a federal lawsuit Monday to overturn the Humane Alternatives to Solitary Confinement Act, or HALT, a new law passed in March to limit the use of solitary confinement in state prisons.

The New York State Correctional Officers and Police Benevolent Association, or NYSCOPBA, claimed in the suit that the new law violates the federal civil rights of its members.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday that all State and City University of New York students will have to get a COVID-19 vaccination if they want to enroll in the fall semester.

The governor also announced other incentives to get more New Yorkers vaccinated as the rate of those getting their shots continues to decline.

Cuomo said the SUNY and CUNY boards will vote to enact the requirement at their next meetings.

Laura Tobia held up a photo of her two brothers, John and Billy, during a Zoom press conference Friday.

“I want to put a face with their names because they're real people,”  Tobia said.

Both of her brothers live in a group home, and are fully vaccinated.  Billy, however,  has a severe case of cerebral palsy and cognitive impairment, along with a very complex seizure disorder. 

Tobia said, due to the state’s delay on updating group home COVID-19 guidelines, Billy still isn't able to attend his day-hab program.

  

The New York State Senate held a hearing this week on a measure that would seal conviction records for up to 2 million New Yorkers who have committed serious crimes and served time in prison for them.

Senators heard from people who were formerly imprisoned or on probation who said the barriers to housing and employment they encounter because of their convictions have led to a form of “perpetual punishment."

Gov. Andrew Cuomo late Wednesday signed the New York Health and Essential Rights, or HERO Act, calling it “a historic step forward for working people.”

The law sets enforceable health and safety standards to protect workers from COVID-19 and future airborne infectious diseases in the workplace. Supporters held a celebratory news conference on Zoom on Thursday.

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