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Cuomo: limo driver and company involved in fatal crash violated several laws

The stretch limo that crashed in Schoharie on Saturday, killing all 18 people aboard plus two pedestrians, had failed inspection just one month ago. Governor Andrew Cuomo, speaking to reporters at a Columbus Day parade in New York City, says the driver of the limo also did not have the proper license. Cuomo says the limo driver and the company , Prestige Limo, violated a number of laws. “The driver of the vehicle, the quote, unquote limousine, did not have the appropriate driver's license to...

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There's a battle brewing between Facebook and the people who make professional videos on YouTube. Facebook has made video a priority over the past year and many of the most popular videos turn out to have originated on YouTube.

A lot of YouTube stars say Facebook is taking money right out of their pockets — and many of them are talking about big money.

You may see new customer service technology at the airport soon. It's part of an effort by federal agencies to make it easier for people to give the government feedback, according to the Washington Post.

The equipment has a simple design, and it looks more like it belongs in a playroom than in an airport.

While Donald Trump's recent position paper on immigration dominates headlines, a new study of unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. digs into the latest numbers.

The Washington, D.C.-based Migration Policy Institute released "An Analysis of Unauthorized Immigrants in the United States by Country and Region of Birth." It's based on U.S. Census Bureau data.

When Washington state legalized recreational marijuana, people wondered if it would mean more stoned drivers on the roads. Two and a half years later, one trend is clear: Police are arresting more drivers with pot in their systems — but what's not clear yet is what that means for traffic safety.

One of the most prestigious names in health care is taking a stand on food.

This week, Cleveland Clinic announced it would sever ties with McDonald's. As of Sept. 18, the McDonald's branch located in the Cleveland Clinic cafeteria will turn off its fryers and close its doors for good. Its lease will not be renewed.

ISIS militants beheaded a renowned Syrian archaeologist in the ancient town of Palmyra, and then hung his body from one of the town's Roman columns.

NPR's Alice Fordham reported on the brutal murder of 81-year-old Khaled al-Asaad:

Government Inquiry Into Clinton Emails Likely To Widen

Aug 19, 2015

For now, federal authorities characterize the Justice Department inquiry into Hillary Clinton's private email server as a security situation: a simple matter of finding out whether classified information leaked out during her tenure as secretary of state, and where it went.

Except, former government officials said, that's not going to be so simple.

"I think that the FBI will be moving with all deliberate speed to determine whether there were serious breaches of national security here," said Ron Hosko, who used to lead the FBI's criminal investigative division.

In March 2013, a 20-foot-wide sinkhole opened up beneath the bedroom floor of a sleeping Florida man and swallowed him whole.

The body of Jeffrey Bush, 36, was never recovered and the house was razed. With the property roped off and the hole filled in, that should have been the tragedy's last scene.

To Learn More, This High-Schooler Left The Classroom

Aug 19, 2015

Like a lot of students, 17-year-old Nick Bain says he really likes his school, but sometimes it can feel like a chore.

"It just feels a little bit like you just have to keep doing one thing after another, but without a whole lot of thinking about an education in general," says Nick.

So one day he decided to write down what he was doing every 15 minutes at the Colorado Academy in Denver.

Judging by some of the most pessimistic reports from California these days, the place is doomed. You can read all about the folly of trying to build cities in a desert.

Just this week, economists at the University of California, Davis, estimated that water shortages will cost the state's economy $2.7 billion this year. Many farmers are limiting the economic damage by ransacking the environment instead, draining underground aquifers.

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