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Maggie O'Reilly, owner of Maggie's Greens
Jan Regan Photography

Keeping Your Produce Fresh and Local with Microgreens

As fall turns to winter in the Finger Lakes, the summer’s fresh produce recedes into memory. A workshop coming to downtown Geneva tomorrow evening offers a way to keep fresh greens on your table by thinking small. Maggie O’Reilly is the owner of Maggie’s Greens, which is a Finger Lakes provider of microgreens.

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(AP) A tax exemption that's deemed essential for farmers and growers across New York state has been extended for another decade.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Monday that the state's Real Property Tax Law exemption has been extended for the next 10 years. Cuomo says the exemption will help farmers and orchard owners to grow their businesses.

The law exempts agricultural producers from paying real property tax on buildings essential to their products, such as temporary greenhouses and dairy barns.

Invasive beetle threatens Cornell University's ash trees

Dec 5, 2018

CORNELL, N.Y. (AP)  Cornell University says it will cut down more than 2,000 ash trees in the next few years because of an invasive beetle.

The university says there are between 50,000 and 100,000 ash trees on university grounds that are threatened by the emerald ash borer.

The university is treating a small percentage with pesticide to temporarily stave off the damage, but it won't be able to protect all of the trees.

Maggie O'Reilly, owner of Maggie's Greens
Jan Regan Photography

As fall turns to winter in the Finger Lakes, the summer’s fresh produce recedes into memory. A workshop coming to downtown Geneva tomorrow evening offers a way to keep fresh greens on your table by thinking small. Maggie O’Reilly is the owner of Maggie’s Greens, which is a Finger Lakes provider of microgreens.

 

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he had a “positive” meeting with President Donald Trump on Wednesday at the White House to talk about funding for a key train tunnel connecting Manhattan to New Jersey.

Cuomo spent the primary and general election season berating Trump and his policies, including at an appearance last summer at a Brooklyn church.

Wegmans has become the latest grocery store in New York to accept a new way to pay for food.

The grocery chain now accepts eWIC, a government assistance program designed to give women, infants and children the money they need to purchase staple foods.

Previously, the WIC program had required users to match specific paper checks with specific foods and buy all of the eligible items at once. The state health department recognized that was inconvenient, and some WIC participants found the program embarrassing.

U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is calling for $1 billion in emergency funding to help battle a polio-like disease that’s affecting a growing number of people — particularly children.

“The disease is called acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM,” she said. “Doctors still don’t know what causes AFM or how it spreads, and there’s no known treatment for those who get this disease.”

Gillibrand, D-N.Y., said the disease targets the spinal cord and can cause muscle weakness or paralysis. Ninety percent of AFM cases have been in children, she said.

Assemblyman Brian Kolb has been unanimously re-elected as Assembly Minority Leader.

The Canandaigua Republican says that with a changing dynamic in the legislature, the role of Assembly Republicans has never been more critical.

Democrats now control all three branches of government, after taking majority control of the State Senate for the first time in eight years.

Opioid treatment programs in New York have not been using a state database that tracks opioid prescriptions, according to an audit from the state comptroller’s office released Monday.

New York’s I-Stop system is designed to reduce overprescription of controlled substances. It requires prescribers to record when they give a patient opioids, and it allows doctors treating people with opioid use disorder to check the database and make sure they’re not already getting the addictive drugs somewhere else.

  

The New York State Senate made history on two fronts Monday as it elected Andrea Stewart-Cousins to be the first woman, and the first African-American woman, to head the chamber in January.

Stewart-Cousins, who has led the Democrats in the Senate since 2012, is poised to become the Senate’s next majority party leader after Democrats won 40 seats in November’s elections. She was a teacher and a journalist before being elected to represent Yonkers in the Westchester County Legislature.

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