WEOS Finger Lakes Public Radio

Brett Dahlberg

Brett is the health reporter and a producer at WXXI News. He has a master’s degree from the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism and before landing at WXXI, he was an intern at WNYC and with Ian Urbina of the New York Times. He also produced freelance reporting work focused on health and science in New York City.
 
Brett grew up in Bremerton, Washington, and holds a bachelor’s degree from Willamette University in Salem, Oregon.
 

Brian Wansink, the Cornell professor who authored six articles retracted by the Journal of the American Medical Association Wednesday, has been removed from all teaching and research at the university, and will retire at the end of this academic year.

“I have been tremendously honored and blessed to be a Cornell professor,” Wansink said.

Most American adults are worried they’ll develop Alzheimer’s, but they’re also optimistic that there will be a cure for the disease in their lifetimes, according to survey results released Monday.

The nationwide survey, conducted by Harris polling on behalf of the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute and pharmaceutical companies Novartis and Amgen, also showed that most American adults want to participate in medical research.

More than a third of the respondents said they were “very willing” to be part of a study.

It’s like “delivering nutrition through the back door,” Maggie McHugh said.

McHugh is the senior nutritionist for Eat Smart New York’s Finger Lakes region. Her organization is partnering with Ontario County to encourage food bank donors to make healthier contributions.

“We provide resources and tools for community members to learn more what healthy food items that they can donate to their local food pantries are,” said McHugh.

A Rochester startup is looking to solve a medical problem with a global scope. VisualDx is building a database of what diseases look like on all skin colors, in an effort to correct persistent racial inequalities in diagnosis.

Scientists have known for decades about racial inequalities in access to medical care. A landmark 1985 report from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, for example, found that minority Americans lived further from doctors and had less ability to pay for medical care compared to white people.

Many American soldiers who attempt suicide have no prior mental health diagnosis, according to the most recent study to make use of data collected by the U.S. Army and the National Institute of Mental Health.  

People with special needs will have access to new ID cards that state Sen. Pam Helming says will help them communicate with emergency responders.

New York Senator Chuck Schumer took aim at the conception of the opioid epidemic as an urban concern Friday.

Standing in front of the one-story police headquarters in Holley, an Erie Canal village of about 2,000 people, the Democrat urged his senate colleagues to support an effort to bring “cutting-edge technology” to the fight against opioids across the state.

Schumer said the money the federal government is spending to fight the opioid epidemic is largely going to cities. That puts the public and law enforcement officers in rural areas at risk, he said.

A western New York woman filed suit against Canada Dry over what she said is false advertising for the company’s ginger ales.

Julie Fletcher, of Bolivar in Allegany County, said she relied on Canada Dry’s claims that it was “made from real ginger” to signify its health benefits.

Fletcher said in a court filing that she knew that ginger root could “calm an upset stomach, and she often purchased Canada Dry for her children [when they] were sick, believing that the ginger root in the beverage would soothe their stomach aches.”