WEOS Finger Lakes Public Radio

Noelle E.C. Evans

Noelle E. C. Evans is a general assignment reporter/producer for WXXI News with a background in documentary filmmaking and education.

Noelle worked in Quito, Ecuador, for a Venezuelan media organization during a critical time in the country’s history. She has a nuanced understanding of the need for freedom of the press, and is conversational in Spanish.

Noelle is a BBC Grace Wyndham Goldie scholar and has worked with BBC Radio Wales and the BBC World Service. She received her M.A. in International Journalism from Cardiff University in Wales – one of the top ten ranking journalism schools in the UK. Noelle was awarded the university’s USA Excellence Scholarship in 2016.

She began as an intern at WXXI in 2014.

 

Advocates are calling on New York state lawmakers to put policies in place to protect nursing home residents. 

This comes in the wake of a report by the state attorney general that there was an undercount of COVID-19 deaths in long-term care facilities.


Environmental advocates say money in the state budget meant for environmental initiatives needs to stay intact. 

Environmental Advocates New York is urging the state not to take the nearly $23 million intended for climate change and environmental initiatives and spend it on other programs.


Environmental advocates say money in the state budget meant for environmental initiatives needs to stay intact. 

Environmental Advocates New York is urging the state not to take the nearly $23 million intended for climate change and environmental initiatives and spend it on other programs.


First responders, people 75 and older, educators, and grocery store workers can now begin to schedule their coronavirus vaccine appointments.

But the wait to get the shot could be months long. 

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced on Monday that people in the 1b category are now eligible for the vaccine. According to the state, though, it could take more than three months before anyone eligible could get their first actual shot. 

Congress finalized a COVID-19 relief deal as of Monday. 

While election results won’t be official until absentee ballots are counted, one local Native American voter says that there is more than partisan politics on the line.

 

Michael Galban is a Native American citizen of the Washoe and Northern Paiute people. He says that while some Indigenous people do not vote in U.S. elections, he did.

The American Red Cross is urging more Black people to donate blood to help sickle cell disease patients, whose treatment depends on closely matching blood types. 

Sickle cell disease is a genetic blood disorder that affects about 100,000 people in the U.S., most of whom are African American. 

 

Working families across the country are figuring out how to provide care for their children with remote and hybrid schooling this year in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Katy Briggs, a physician’s assistant and single mother, said that she’s struggled to balance telemedicine calls, her children’s education, and everything else.

 

Senator Chuck Schumer (D-New York) urged the Trump administration and Congress to negotiate a new coronavirus relief bill and provide emergency funds to the United States Postal Service. 

During a stop in Rochester on Thursday, the Senate Minority Leader said that without $25 billion in emergency funding, vital mail delivery of medications, paychecks, and mail-in ballots would be compromised.

The New York Civil Liberties Union has reached a settlement with Immigration and Customs Enforcement over coronavirus protections for detainees being held in Batavia.

The settlement assures that detainees at the Buffalo Federal Detention Center who are at high-risk of health complications if they contract the virus, will be given protections that are in line with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

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