WEOS Finger Lakes Public Radio

Karen DeWitt

Karen DeWitt is Capitol Bureau Chief for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 public radio stations in New York State. She has covered state government and politics for the network since 1990.

She is also a regular contributor to the statewide public television program about New York State government, New York Now. She appears on the reporter’s roundtable segment, and interviews newsmakers. 

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism, from the Legislative Correspondents Association, and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women’s Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Governor Cuomo’s former closest aide received a prison sentence today of six years after being convicted of  illegally gaining over $300,000  in  bribery schemes.

Judge Valerie Caproni sided with the wishes of federal prosecutors, who sought five or more years in prison for Percoco , following his conviction on three counts of bribery for participating in two illegal schemes to enrich himself while offering illegal services to a power plant company and an Syracuse development firm.

More talk of Governor Andrew Cuomo seeking the Presidency in 2020 has been fueled by the governor’s decisive victory over a candidate from the progressive left of his party. But the governor still says he’s only running for a third term to lead New York State.

Cuomo beat actor and education advocate Cynthia Nixon by a two to one margin in the September 13th primary, and he has a double digit lead against his Republican challenger in the polls.

The general election for governor in New York is heating up, with the Republican candidate, Marc Molinaro, calling for the resignation of a former advisor to incumbent Andrew Cuomo, while the sitting governor rallied against President Trump.

Molinaro is making  a statewide string of appearances to focus on what he says is rampant corruption in the Cuomo Administration.

“This governor is allowing almost a corrupted criminal enterprise to function within state government,” Molinaro said. “And it needs to come to an end.”

One day after winning big in a Democratic primary, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he received votes because he’s delivered on real issues that matter to people.

Cuomo said all the discussion during the primary campaign about which candidate is the real progressive was misguided. He said he won because he’s delivered on a number of progressive items for New Yorkers already, including paid family leave, a phase-in to a $15 minimum hourly wage and gay marriage.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo handily won in a Democratic primary against actor Cynthia Nixon. Cuomo’s current lieutenant governor, Kathy Hochul, also won, as did Cuomo’s choice for attorney general, New York City Public Advocate Tish James.  

Thursday is primary day in New York, and the hottest race is between Democratic incumbent Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his challenger, actor and education advocate Cynthia Nixon.

The Democratic primary for lieutenant governor is turning out to be closer than the governor’s race — according to the polls, anyway.

New York City Councilmember Jumaane Williams is challenging incumbent Kathy Hochul for the post.

Williams said he brings a different vision to the office. He said he wants to be independent and sees the lieutenant governor’s role as similar to the post of New York City public advocate, an elected position that is meant to represent the needs of the public.

Democratic primary voters on Thursday have a choice of four candidates for state attorney general after former AG Eric Schneiderman resigned in May over allegations he physically abused several women that he dated.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo had been gaining momentum in the days leading up to the Sept. 13 Democratic primary for governor, but two controversial incidents over the weekend could set the governor back in his race against challenger Cynthia Nixon.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and his Democratic primary challenger, Cynthia Nixon, squared off in the only debate before the Sept. 13 election in a testy and contentious hour long discussion broadcast by CBS2 in New York City from Hofstra University on Long Island on Wednesday night. 

The choice, according to Nixon and Cuomo, is between who is more qualified to run New York state, versus the desire for change. 

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