WEOS Finger Lakes Public Radio

Caitlin Whyte

Caitlin joins WXXI after working down the street at Stephens Media Group where, she co hosted a children's radio show, "Saturday Morning CarTunes" on WARM 101.3 and worked as a traffic reporter for various affiliates.

Prior to that, she lived in Western Alaska where she worked for KNOM in Nome.  When she was not engrossed in all things Iditarod, Caitlin served as the community and education spot producer and hosted the weekday morning program.

Originally from Rochester, Caitlin graduated from SUNY Plattsburgh with a B.S in Audio/Radio Production and Broadcast Management. She is excited to make the jump to public radio and host Weekend Edition.

 

A series of listening sessions are being held across the state on regulating marijuana.

The sessions hope to garner input from community members and key stakeholders on the implementation of a regulated marijuana system in New York.

Fifteen events will be conducted around the state, wrapping up this month.

In January, Gov. Andrew Cuomo commissioned a multi-agency study led by the Department of Health to assess the impact of such a program.

A major disaster declaration has been issued for seven counties that sustained serious damage during severe storms and flash flooding in August.

The FEMA Assistance can be used towards funding for emergency protective measures, debris removal and repairs to public infrastructure.

State and local estimates were at more than $36 million in response costs and infrastructure damages.

FEMA generally covers 75 percent of approved recovery projects 

Tuesday was the last full day of the New York Association of Counties fall seminar in Rochester, where weather and climate were the topic of the keynote address.

The keynote speaker was Josh Darr, senior vice president and lead meteorologist at JLT, which does risk assessments.

He says weather isn’t getting worse, but more weather is happening in the extremes.

Darr says counties need to watch weather patterns to decide how to spend their assets -- whether it's people, time or money.

A series of roundtable discussions was hosted Monday by the NYSAC (New York State Association of Counties) Women's Leadership Council, a statewide program focused specifically on providing support to women in county government. NYSAC is holding its fall seminar in Rochester this weeek.

The discussions covered subjects like women voting, fundraising, and personal and professional growth.

MaryEllen Odell is the Putnam County Executive and chair of the council and talked about a younger woman in a newly elected position she once met at an prior conference.

The National Toy Hall of Fame here in Rochester has announced the 12 finalists for this year’s induction.

Chris Bensch, vice president for collections and lead curator at the Hall of Fame, says a range of toys are contenders this year, including Chutes & Ladders, American Girl Dolls, tic-tac-toe, chalk and the Magic 8 Ball.

"This year, the Susan Lucci of the toy world is the Magic 8 ball. This is its seventh time on the finalists list; it has not made it into the Hall of Fame yet."

He says this year is especially exciting because six of the 12 finalists are brand-new to the final round.


The ribbon was cut on the redesigned passenger security checkpoint at the Greater Rochester International Airport Wednesday morning.

Monroe County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo unveiled the new checkpoint as part of the ongoing renovations

"Not only does it look better, not only does it feel better, it functions better as well and that’s incredibly important."

The new space has six lanes, which is the same as before, but they are now wider and more flexible.

What happens to the butter sculpture at the New York State Fair once the event is over? Well, for the third year, it will be recycled and used for electricity.

Following its 13-day stint at the State Fair, the 50th annual butter sculpture was deconstructed, plopped into garbage bags and sent west, to Noblehurst Farms in Livingston County.

Here, it will be recycled into energy. Market Area Manager of the dairy farm Michel Boerman says they have been producing biogas energy with area food waste and manure since 2014.


Countless parents across New York are purchasing new school supplies for students.

But Senator Chuck Schumer is calling on the government to regulate toxic chemicals in school supplies.

Multiple reports by non-profits and consumer advocacy groups have raised concerns that popular back-to-school supplies contained dangerous levels of toxic chemicals.

He says the results of an independent report from US PIRG were alarming.

The Cumming Nature Center is a little oasis about an hour south of Rochester. With miles of quiet trails through swamplands and towering pine trees, it’s a great place to talk about citizen science.

So what exactly does that term mean?

Nathan Hayes, the director of the nature center, says its the “crowdsourcing of scientific information. Multiple people all over the place putting the puzzle pieces together to get the picture.”

There is so much information to collect, Hayes says, that scientists alone can’t do it all. That’s where the rest of us can help. He says people can get involved and collect valuable information wherever they may be.

“We can study -- we should study -- these woods, and not worry about the Amazon. I mean, worry about the Amazon, but you don’t have to go away to contribute to important scientific base of knowledge, you can do it in your backyard.”


Between the 25 cent milk and funnel cake, Narcan training will also be available at the New York State Fair.

This is the first time the opioid reversing drug will be available at the fair, with trainings every day, provided by the state Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services.

Rob Kent is the General Council at that office, and says even though its unusual setting, New Yorkers need to be aware that “we’re in a major crisis here with opioids."

He says it’s just another way to get the lifesaving drug into the hands of more New Yorkers.

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